The Animals — Videos

Posted on October 4, 2015. Filed under: Art, Communications, Culture, Entertainment, Life, Music, Songs, Videos | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

TheAnimalsthe-animals-the-animals3

 ericburdonandtheanimals-ericburdonandtheanimalsanimals 2eric burdon I used to be an animal  The-Animals-Photo-by-Pammy-BabyBlue

Animals – House Of The Rising Sun (1964)

The Animals – The House of the Rising Sun (The best video top 10 of all time)

The Animals – The Animals (US Album – 1964) Full Album

The Animals – The Animals (Full Album)

“The House of the Rising Sun” (Traditional, arranged Alan Price) – 0:00 “Blue Feeling” (Jimmy Henshaw) – 4:25 “I Ain’t Got You” (Calvin Carter)  – 7:00 “I’ve Been Around” (Domino, Antoine) – 9:30 “Let the Good Times Roll” (Shirley and Lee) – 11:05 “For Miss Caulker” (Burdon, Eric) – 13:00 “Roadrunner” (Holland–Dozier–Holland) – 16:55 “Bring It On Home to Me” (Cooke, Sam) – 19:49 “Mess Around” (Ertegün, Ahmet) – 22:25 “How You’ve Changed (?) – 24:44 “Dimples” ( Bracken,James – Hooker, John Lee) – 27:55 “I Believe to My Soul (Charles, Ray) – 31:10 “The Girl Can’t Help It” (Troup, Bobby) – 34:36 “Roberta” (Smith, Balinrobbins) – 37:00 “Club-A-GoGo” (Price, Alan-Burdon, Eric) – 39:05 “Worried Life Blues” (Estes, Sleepy John) – 41:23 “I Can’t Believe It” (Burdon, Eric) – 45:34 “I’m in Love Again” (Holland–Dozier–Holland) – 49:04 “I’m Going to Change the World” (Burdon, Eric) 52:05 Memphis, Tennessee (Berry, Chuck) 55:40 The Right Time (Sykes, Roosevelt) 58:48 Gonna Send You Back to Walker (Matthews – Hammond, John Jr.) 1:02:33 I’m Crying (Price, Alan-Burdon, Eric) – 1:05:00 Talkin’ ‘bout You (Charles, Ray) – 1:07:50 We Gotta Get Out of This Place (Mann – Weil) – 1:09:42

We Gotta Get Out Of This Place-The Animals-(Live)-1965

Eric Burdon – The Animals – We Gotta Get Out Of This Place

The Animals – It’s My Life (Live, 1965) ♫♥50 YEARS

The Animals (NME-1965) Don’t let me be misunderstood

The Animals – Boom Boom (1965)

The Animals live Compilation video 1965 HD

The Animals Live Paris Olympia 1966

ERIC BURDON & THE ANIMALS – Live Berlin German TV

Sky Pilot – Eric Burdon and The Animals [Video original]

The Animals – It’s My Life

Goin’ Down Slow – The Animals

The Animals “don’t let me be misunderstood”

THE ANIMALS – “PRETTY THING”

The Animals – Bring It On Home To Me (clip, 1965) ♫♥50 YEARS

The Animals – Bring It On Home To Me (1965) ♫♥50 YEARS

The Animals – Bring It On Home To Me (Live, 1965) UPGRADE ♫♥50 YEARS

Eric Burdon – Hold On I’m Coming (Live, 1966)

THE ANIMALS – DON´T BRING ME DOWN

Eric Burdon & The Animals : San Franciscan Nights (Live 1967)

Eric Burdon & The Animals – When I Was Young (1967)

Eric Burdon and The Animals – When I Was Young (1967) HQ

Eric Burdon & Animals – See see rider 1967

Eric Burdon & The Animals – Hey Gyp (1967) HQ

Tabacco Road – Eric Burdon and the Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals – To Love Somebody – 1968

To love somebody Eric Burdon & Animals lyrics

Eric Burdon & War – Love Is All Around, Copenhagen 1971

The Animals (Part 1 of 3)

The Animals (Part 2 of 3)

The Animals (Part 3 of 3)

The Animals ~ Tribute {Pictures}

The Animals – Meltdown (Live, 1983 reunion)

The Animals – Bring It On Home To Me (Live, 1983 reunion) HD ♫♥50 YEARS

The Animals – Trying To Get To You (Live, 1983 reunion) HD

The Animals – The Animals (Full Album)

The Animals – Bring it on home to me (Live, 1983, NY – Reunion)

The Animals – It’s Too Late (Live, 1983 reunion) HD

Eric Burdon – Gas Tank (1983)

Eric Burdon sings 3 songs, Live 1986 ♫♥50 YEARS

Eric Burdon – House of the Rising Sun (Live, 1998) ♥♫50 YEARS

Eric Burdon and The Animals – Berlin Live 2015

Eric Burdon – Bring It On Home To Me (Live at Lugano, 2006) ♫♥50 YEARS

Eric Burdon – Sky Pilot (Live at Lugano, 2006)

Eric Burdon – House of the Rising Sun (Live at Lugano, 2006)

Eric Burdon – Mardi Gras in New Orleans – (Live Lugano 2006)

Eric Burdon Spill The Wine Live at Lugano, 2006 YouTube

Eric Burdon – I Put A Spell On You (Live at Lugano, 2006)

Eric Burdon & The Animals – House of the Rising Sun (Live, 2011) HD ♥♫ 50 YEARS & counting

Eric Burdon & The Animals – House Of The Rising Sun (Kombank Arena, Beograd, 15.07.2013.)

Background Articles and Videos

Eric Burdon Interview

Eric Burdon & The Animals on “The MIke Douglas Show” 1967 (2 songs + interview)

Eric Burdon & The Animals – River Deep Mountain High + interview (Live, 1968)

Eric Burdon & War on The Della Reese Show (Live, circa 1969)

Eric Burdon & War – Spirit/Love Is All Around/Train Train (Live, 1971)

Eric Burdon – Water (Official Lyric Video)

Eric Burdon – Interview-(1982)

Eric Burdon – Interview with Jools Holland (2002) -HD-

Eric Burdon 2002 Interview in Tacoma

Eric Burdon & Lonnie Jordan – Interview with Jools Holland (2008) -HD-

Eric Burdon – Interview 2010

Eric Burdon Interview

Eric Burdon at SXSW 2013

Eric Burdon – The Animals and Beyond

Interview with Eric Burdon (The Animals)

The Pace Report: “Burdon-nistic Warrior” The Eric Burdon Interview

eric burdon dont let it be

DIGITAL IMAGE /F Kitchener, Ontario - Saturday Aug 11, 2007 - Eric Burdon and the Animals perform for a large Saturday night crowd on the Main Stage at Civic Squart, part of the Kitchener Blues Festival. Photo by Nick Iwanyshyn, Record Staff. - Story by... - Request #17415 • Blues • 8:39:32 PM • 11/08/07 • Kitchener Bl

Eric-Burdon

The Animals

“…The Animals were an English music group of the 1960s known in the United States as part of the British Invasion. Known for their gritty, bluesy sound and deep-voiced frontman Eric Burdon, as exemplified by their signature songs “The House of the Rising Sun”, “Sky Pilot” and “We Gotta Get out of This Place”, the band balanced tough, rock-edged pop singles against rhythm and blues-oriented album material. The Animals underwent numerous personnel changes and emerged as an exponent of psychedelic rock before dissolving at the end of the decade. They had a comeback in 1983 and started a world tour. In early 1984 the band disbanded. There have been several reunions of the original group and in recent times Burdon and original drummer John Steel have been touring with new versions of the Animals as Eric Burdon & the Animals and Animals & Friends respectively. …”

“…Legacy

The original Animals were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. Their influence can be heard in artists as varied as The Doors, The White Stripes, Joe Cocker, The Cult, Frijid Pink, The Chocolate Watchband, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, Janis Joplin, David Johansen, and Fine Young Cannibals. In 2003, the band’s version of “House of the Rising Sun” ranked number 122 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list. Their 1965 hit single “We Gotta Get out of This Place” was ranked number 233 on Rolling Stone’s The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list that was compiled in 2004. Both songs are included in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Animals

 

Eric Victor Burdon

Eric Victor Burdon (born 11 May 1941) is an English singer-songwriter best known as a member and vocalist of rock band the Animals and the funk band War[2]and for his aggressive stage performance. He was ranked 57th in Rolling Stone‘s list The 100 Greatest Singers of All Time.[3]

Career

The Animals

Burdon was lead singer of the Animals, formed during 1962 in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. The original band was the Alan Price Rhythm and Blues Combo, which formed in 1958;[4] they became The Animals shortly after Burdon joined the band. The Animals combined electric blues with rock and in the USA were one of the leading bands of the British Invasion.[5] Along with the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Hollies, the Dave Clark Five, and the Kinks, the group introduced British music and fashion. Burdon’s powerful voice can be heard on the Animals’ singles “The House of the Rising Sun“, “Sky Pilot“, “Monterey“, “I’m Crying“, “Boom Boom“, “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood“, “Bring It On Home to Me“, “Baby Let Me Take You Home“, “It’s My Life“, “We Gotta Get out of This Place“, “Don’t Bring Me Down“, and “See See Rider“.

Eric Burdon and the Animals

By late 1966, the other original members, including keyboardist Alan Price, had left.[6] Burdon has often attributed the disintegration of the band to conflict with Price, specifically that Price had claimed sole rights and ownership to “House of the Rising Sun.”[7] Burdon and drummer Barry Jenkins reformed the group as Eric Burdon and The Animals. This morepsychedelic incarnation featured future Family member John Weider and was sometimes called Eric Burdon and the New Animals. Keyboardist Zoot Money joined during 1968 until they split up in 1969.[8] This group’s hits included the ballad “San Franciscan Nights“, the grungeheavy metal-pioneering “When I Was Young“, “Monterey“, the anti-Vietnam anthemSky Pilot“, and the progressive cover of “Ring of Fire“.

In 1975, the original Animals reunited and recorded an album called Before We Were So Rudely Interrupted, released in 1977[9] and overlooked due to the dawning of punk. In May 1983, The Animals reunited with their original line-up and released the album Ark on 16 June 1983, along with the singles “The Night” and “Love Is For All Time”. A world tour followed, and the concert at Wembley Arena, London, recorded on 31 December 1983, was released in 1984 as Rip it to Shreds. Their concert at the Royal Oak Theatre in April 1984 was released in 2008 as Last Live Show; the band members were augmented by Zoot Money, Nippy Noya, Steve Gregory, and Steve Grant. The original Animals broke up for the last time at the end of 1984.

Although the band Burdon formed in the late 1960s was sometimes called Eric Burdon and the New Animals, it wasn’t until 1998 that the name Eric Burdon and the New Animals was officially adopted. The 1998 band had bassist Dave Meros, guitarist Dean Restum, drummer Aynsley Dunbar and keyboard guitarist Neal Morse. They recordedLive at the Coach House on 17 October 1998, released on video and DVD in December that year. In 1999 they released The Official Live Bootleg No. 2 and in August 2000The Official Live Bootleg 2000, with Martin Gerschwitz on keyboards.

In June 2003, he formed another Eric Burdon and the Animals, with keyboardist Martin Gerschwitz, bassist Dave Meros, guitarist Dean Restum, and drummer Bernie Pershey. They disbanded in 2005. During 2008 Burdon toured again as Eric Burdon and the Animals with a variable line-up of backing musicians.[10]

On 13 December 2008, Burdon lost a three-year legal battle to win the name “The Animals” in the UK. Since then drummer John Steel owned the rights in the UK only. Burdon still tours as Eric Burdon and the Animals, but was prevented from using the name “The Animals” in Britain while the case was under appeal. Steel was a member in its heyday and left before the band split up in 1966. Steel later played in various reunion versions of the band with Burdon.[11] On 9 September 2013 Burdon’s appeal was allowed.[12] Eric Burdon is now entitled to use the name “The Animals” in the UK.

2008 Reunion flyer

War]

During 1969, while living in San Francisco, Burdon joined forces with Californian funk rock band War. In April 1970, the resulting album created as a result of this association was entitled Eric Burdon Declares “War” which produced the singles “Spill the Wine” and “Tobacco Road“. A two-disc set entitled The Black-Man’s Burdon, was released later in September 1970. The singles from the double album, “Paint It, Black” and “They Can’t Take Away Our Music“, had moderate success during 1971. During this time Burdon collapsed on the stage during a concert, caused by an asthma attack, and War continued the tour without him.

In 1976, a compilation album, Love Is All Around, released by ABC Records, included recordings of Eric Burdon with War doing a live version of “Paint it, Black” and a cover ofThe Beatles song “A Day in the Life.” The band also featured ex-NFL star Deacon Jones who coined the term “quarterback sack” and sang on the band’s 1975 song “Why Can’t We Be Friends?

Eric Burdon and War were reunited for the first time in 37 years, to perform an Eric Burdon & War reunion at the concert at the Royal Albert Hall London on 21 April 2008. The concert coincided with a major reissue campaign by Rhino Records (UK), which released all the War albums including Eric Burdon Declares “War” and The Black-Man’s Burdon.

Eric Burdon at the Daffodil Festival in Pierce County, Washington, in 2008

Solo career

Burdon began a solo career in 1971 with the Eric Burdon Band, continuing with a hard rockheavy metal–funk style. In August 1971, he recorded the album Guilty! which featured the blues shouter Jimmy Witherspoon, and also Ike White of the San Quentin Prison Band. In 1973, the band performed at the Reading Festival and in 1974 they travelled to New York City. At the end of 1974, the band released the album Sun Secrets and this was followed by the album Stop in 1975. Burdon moved to Germany in 1977 and recorded the album Survivor with a line-up including guitarist Alexis Korner and keyboardist Zoot Money; the album also had a line-up of four guitarists and three keyboard players and is known for its interesting album cover, which depicts Burdon screaming. The album was produced by former Animal’s bassist Chas Chandler. The original release included a booklet of illustrated lyrics done in ink by Burdon himself.

In May 1978, he recorded the album Darkness Darkness at the Roundwood House in County Laois, Republic of Ireland, using Ronnie Lane’s Mobile Studio and featuring guitarist and vocalist Bobby Tench from the Jeff Beck Group, who had left Streetwalkers a few months before. The album was eventually released in 1980.[13] During January 1979, Burdon changed his band for a tour taking in Hamburg, Germany, and the Netherlands.

On 28 August 1982, “The Eric Burdon Band” including Red Young (keyboards) performed at the Rockpalast Open Air Concert in Lorelei, Germany. Following this Burdon toured heavily with his solo project from March 1984 to March 1985, taking in UK, Spain, Germany, Sweden, Canada and Australia. In 1986, Burdon published his autobiography entitled I Used To Be An Animal, But I’m Alright Now.

In March 1979, he played a concert in Cologne and changed the band’s name to “Eric Burdon’s Fire Department”,[14] whose line-up included backing vocalist Jackie Carter of Silver Convention, Bertram Engel of Udo Lindenberg‘s “Panik Orchester” and Jean-Jaques Kravetz. In mid 1980, they recorded the album The Last Drive. “Eric Burdon’s Fire Department” toured Europe with this line-up and Paul Millins and Louisiana Redmade special appearances in Spain and Italy. By December 1980, the band had broken up.

In April 1981, Christine Buschmann began to film Comeback with Burdon as the star. They created a new “Eric Burdon Band” whose line-up included Louisiana Red, Tony Braunagle, John Sterling and Snuffy Walden. This band recorded live tracks in Los Angeles. They also recorded in Berlin with another line-up, the only remaining member being John Sterling. In September 1981, the final scenes of Comeback were shot in the Berlin Metropole and Burdon and his band continued to tour through Australia and North America. A studio album titled Comeback was released in 1982. The 1983 album Power Company also included songs recorded during the Comeback project.

In 1988, he put together a band with 15 musicians including Andrew Giddings – keyboards, Steve Stroud – bass, Adrian Sheppard – drums, Jamie Moses – guitar and four backing vocalists to record the album I Used To Be An Animal in Malibu, in the United States. In 1990, Eric Burdon’s cover version of “Sixteen Tons” was used for the film Joe Versus the Volcano. The song, which played at the beginning of the film, was also released as a single. He also recorded the singles “We Gotta Get out of this Place” with Katrina & The Waves and “No Man’s Land” with Tony Carey and Anne Haigis. Later in 1990, he had a small line-up of anEric Burdon Band featuring Jimmy Zavala (sax and harmonica), Dave Meros(bass), Jeff Naideau (keyboards), Thom Mooney (drums) and John Sterling (guitar) before he began a tour with The Doors guitaristRobby Krieger and they appeared at a concert from Ventura Beach, California, which was released as a DVD on 20 June 2008.

On 13 April 2004, he released a “comeback” album, My Secret Life, which was his first album with new recordings for 16 years. When John Lee Hooker died in 2001, Burdon had written the song “Can’t Kill the Boogieman” the co-writers of the songs, on the album, were Tony Braunagel and Marcelo Nova. In 2005, they released a live album, Athens Traffic Live, with special DVD bonus material and a bonus studio track and disbanded in November 2005. He began a short touring as “The Blues Knights”.

On 27 January 2006, he released his blues–R&B album Soul of a Man. This album was dedicated to Ray Charles and John Lee Hooker. The cover of the album was a picture which was sent to Burdon a few years before. Burdon then formed a new band, with the following members: Red Young (keyboards), Paula O’Rourke (bass), Eric McFadden (guitar), Carl Carlton (guitar), and Wally Ingram (drums). They also performed at the Lugano Festival and in 2007 he toured as the headlining act of the “Hippiefest” line-up, produced and hosted by Country Joe McDonald.

Burdon, at 71, recorded an E.P. with Cincinnati garage band the Greenhornes called, simply, Eric Burdon & the Greenhornes. The album was recorded at an all-analogue recording studio,[15] and released on 23 November 2012 as part of Record Store Day‘s “Black Friday.”

In 2013, Eric Burdon came out with a new album called, Til Your River Runs Dry. The lead single off the album was called, “Water” and was inspired by a conversation he had with former Soviet premier Mikhail Gorbachev.[16]

Other associations

In 1991, Burdon and Brian Auger formed the “Eric Burdon – Brian Auger Band” with the following line-up: Eric Burdon – vocals, Brian Auger – keyboards, vocals, Dave Meros – bass, vocals, Don Kirkpatrick – guitar, vocals, and Paul Crowder – drums, vocals. By 1992, Larry Wilkins replaced Kirkpatrick and Karma Auger (Brian’s son) replaced Crowder and in 1993 they added Richard Reguria (percussion). The live album Access All Areas was then released. In 1994 the “Eric Burdon – Brian Auger Band” disbanded. Burdon then formed the “Eric Burdon’s i Band”. The line-up included Larry Wilkins, Dean Restum (guitar), Dave Meros (bass) and Mark Craney (drums).

In 1995, Burdon made a guest appearance with Bon Jovi, singing “It’s My Life“/”We Gotta Get out of This Place” medley at the Hall of Fame. He also released the album Lost Within the Halls of Fame, with past tracks and re-recordings of some songs from I Used to be an Animal. In October 1996, Aynsley Dunbar replaced Craney on drums. The Official Live Bootleg was recorded in 1997 and in May that year Larry Wilkins died of cancer. He also released the compilations Soldier of Fortune and I’m Ready which featured recordings from the 1970s and 1980s.

In 2000, he recorded the song “Power to the People” together with Ringo Starr and Billy Preston for the motion picture Steal This Movie!. On 11 May 2001, the Animals were inducted into the Rock Walk of Fame on Burdon’s 60th birthday. On 3 March 2002, the live album Live in Seattle was recorded. Ex-War member Lee Oskar made a guest appearance on the album. In 2003 he made a guest appearance on the albumJoyous in the City of Fools by the Greek rock band Pyx Lax, singing lead vocal on “Someone Wrote ‘Save me’ On a Wall”.

In 2001, his second critically acclaimed memoir, “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood,” written with author/filmmaker J. Marshall Craig, was released in the US, followed by editions in Greece, Germany and Australia; it covers the British Invasion, moving to Los Angeles and Palm Springs, and various anecdotes about Rock and Roll stardom.[17]

On 7 June 2008, Burdon performed at the memorial service of Bo Diddley in Gainesville, Florida.[18] During July and August 2008, Burdon appeared as the headline act of the “Hippiefest”. He also recorded the single “For What It’s Worth” with Carl Carlton and Max Buskohl.

On 12 November 2008, Rolling Stone ranked Eric Burdon No. 57 on the list of the 100 Greatest Singers of all Time. On 22 January 2009 he first performed with his new band, including keyboardist Red Young, guitarist Rick Hirsch, bass player Jack Bryant and drummer Ed Friedland. For a few months he was sick and did not perform except in the United States. On 26 June, he began his European tour. The band includes Red Young (keyboards), Billy Watts (guitar), Terry Wilson (bass), Brannen Temple (drums) and Georgia Dagaki (cretan lyra). On 7 August, the tour ended.

On Monday 28 January 2013, Eric Burdon made a rare appearance performing on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, backed by the Roots. Fallon hyped Burdon’s current album, ‘Til Your River Runs Dry.

On Tuesday 23 July 2013, he guested on stage with Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band at Cardiff Millennium Stadium, performing “We Gotta Get Out of This Place.”

In August 2013, he toured with Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo.

Influence

The sound of The Animals influenced many Britpop, alternative rock and power pop groups as well as the bands Deep Purple, The Black Crowes, The Hives, Grand Funk Railroad, MC5, The White Stripes[19] and his voice has been highly respected by many singers such as Jim Morrison, Robert Plant, Tom Petty, David Johansen, Joe Cocker, Bruce Springsteen,[20] Ian Hunter, Ryan Adams, Julian Thome, Jack White, John Mellencamp and Dan Zanes.[21]

Film career

Burdon wanted to act in the film Blowup (1966). Director Michelangelo Antonioni wanted to use him as a musician in a club scene, but Burdon turned the role down because he had acted in films before in which he sang songs. He disbanded The Animals and went to California, where he met Jim Morrison and came to the realisation that his real inspiration was acting.

Later, he turned down major roles in Zabriskie Point and Performance (both 1970).

In 1973, he formed the Eric Burdon Band and recorded the soundtrack for his own film project, Mirage. He spent much money to make this film, produced as a film for Atlantic. The film and the soundtrack were to be released in July 1974, but somehow they never were. The soundtrack was released in 2008.[22]

In 1979, he acted in the TV film The 11th Victim, then in the German film Gibbi – Westgermany (1980). In 1982, he starred in another German film, Comeback, again as a singer.

In 1991, he had a cameo appearance in The Doors.[23]

In 1998, he acted as himself in the Greek film My Brother and I,[24] followed by a bigger role in the German film Snow on New Year’s Eve (1999).

In the following years, he was credited in many documentaries and in an independent film called Fabulous Shiksa in Distress (2003), along with Ned Romero and Ted Markland.

In 2007, he performed the traditionalSometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child” in the drama festival film The Blue Hour and in a documentary about Joshua Tree, called Nowhere Now (2008).

Discography

Filmography

  • 1980: Gibbi (West German)
  • 1982: Comeback
  • 1991: The Doors
  • 1999: Snow on New Year’s Eve
  • 2001: Plaster Caster
  • 2001: Screamin’ Jay Hawkins: I Put a Spell on Me
  • 2003: Fabulous Shiksa in Distress
  • 2003: Yes, You Can Go Home
  • 2007: The Blue Hour
  • 2008: Nowhere Now: The Ballad of Joshua Tree
  • 2010: Remembering Nigel

References

  1. Jump up^ “eric burdon & the greenhornes, the ep, buy the digital download or 12 inch vinyl ep”. Lojinx.com. 2013-04-20. Retrieved 2015-08-25.
  2. Jump up^ “Soul of a Man: The Story of Eric Burdon”. Crawdaddy.com. 2009-01-28. Retrieved 2014-04-24.
  3. Jump up^ “100 Greatest Singers”. Rolling Stone. 2008-11-27. Retrieved2014-04-24.
  4. Jump up^ Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock and Roll
  5. Jump up^ “Eric Burdon: Biography, Life, Facts and Songs”.Famoussingers.org. Retrieved 28 August 2015.
  6. Jump up^ Johnson, Pete. “POPULAR RECORDS.” Los Angeles Times 04 Sep 1966. ProQuest. Print.
  7. Jump up^ Greenblatt, Mike. “The Beast in Burdon.” Goldmine Fall 2013: 42-4. ProQuest. Print.
  8. Jump up^ Johnson, Pete. “One More Shift for the Animals.” Los Angeles Times 13 May 1968. ProQuest. Print.
  9. Jump up^ “Before We Were So Rudely Interrupted by The Animals”. MTV. 1977-08-01. Retrieved 2015-08-25.
  10. Jump up^ Eric Burdon vocals and percussion, Red Young keyboards and vocals, Hilton Valentine guitar and vocals, Paula O’Rourke bass and vocals, Billy Watts guitar, Steve Conte lead guitar, Tony Braunagel drums, Herman Matthews drums, Steve Murphy drums, Bobby Furgo violin
  11. Jump up^ Daniel Boffey, Eric Burdon loses battle to be the only Animal, The Daily Mail, 14 December 2008.
  12. Jump up^ “You can’t Steel this name: Burdon of proof satisfied”, with a link to the decision in the matter of Burdon’s opposition to the trademark application by John Steel.
  13. Jump up^ “Darkness Darkness – Eric Burdon | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2014-04-24.
  14. Jump up^ “Career Timeline”. Ericburdon.com. Retrieved 2015-08-25.
  15. Jump up^ “Welcome to 1979”. Welcometo1979.com. Retrieved 2014-04-24.
  16. Jump up^ “Eric Burdon, “Til Your River Runs Dry” – Album Review”. Ultimateclassicrock.com. 2013-02-11. Retrieved 2014-04-24.
  17. Jump up^ Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood. Thunder’s Mouth Press. 2001.ISBN 978-1560253303.
  18. Jump up^ “Bo Diddley”. Canada.com. 2008-06-08. Retrieved 2014-04-24.
  19. Jump up^ “The Animals | Similar Artists, Influenced By, Followers”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2014-04-24.
  20. Jump up^ Perry, Shawn. “The Eric Burdon Interview”. Vintagerock.com. Retrieved 2015-08-25.
  21. Jump up^ “Eric Burdon | Similar Artists, Infuenced By, Followers”. AllMusic. 1941-05-11. Retrieved 2014-04-24.
  22. Jump up^ Dave Thompson (2008-02-27). “Mirage – Eric Burdon | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2015-08-25.
  23. Jump up^ “The Doors (1991) – IMDb”. M.imdb.com. Retrieved 2015-08-25.
  24. Jump up^ “O adelfos mou ki ego (1998) – IMDb”. M.imdb.com. 1998-01-09. Retrieved 2015-08-25.
  25. Jump up^ “Eric Burdon, Actor” by Ken Stoddard. Rolling Stone Vol.1 No.2, 23 November 1967

Further reading

  • Burdon, Eric (1986). I Used to Be an Animal, but I’m All Right Now. Faber and Faber. ISBN 0-571-13492-0.
  • Kent, Jeff (1989). The Last Poet: The Story of Eric Burdon. Witan Books. ISBN 0-9508981-2-0.
  • Egan, Sean (2012). Animal Tracks – Updated and Expanded: The Story of The Animals, Newcastle’s Rising Sons. Askill Publishing. ISBN 978-0-9545750-4-5.
  • Burdon, Eric (with Craig, J. Marshall) (2001). Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood: A Memoir. Thunder’s Mouth Press. ISBN 1-56025-330-4.
  • Carroll, Sherry (2013). Even Rock and Roll has Fairy Tales: The Flight of the Shiny Happy Sherry Fairy. Booktango. ISBN 978-1-46892-637-8.

External links

Eric Burdon

http://ericburdon.ning.com/photo

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Abba–Videos

The Animals–Videos

Joan Baez–Videos

The Beach Boys–Videos

The Beatles–Videos

Bee Gees–Videos

The Byrds–Videos

Mariah Carey–Videos

Johnny Cash–Videos

Ray Charles–Videos

Joe Cocker–Videos

Nat King Cole–Videos

Judy Collins–Videos

Perry Como–Videos

Sam Cooke–Videos

Sandy Denny–Videos

John Denver–Videos

Celine Dion–Videos

The Doors–Videos

Bob Dylan–Videos

Eagles–Video

Marianne Faithfull–Videos

Roberta Flack–Videos

Aretha Franklin–Videos

Marvin Gaye-Videos

Michael Jackson and Jackson Five–Videos

Elton John–Videos

Janis Joplan–Videos

The Kinks–Videos

Led Zeppelin–Videos

Little Richard–Videos

The Lovin’ Spoonful–Videos

The Mamas and Papas–Videos

Barry Manilow–Videos

Johnny Mathis–Videos

Don McLean–Videos

Bette Midler–Videos

Joni Mitchell–Videos

Olivia Newton-John–Videos

Roy Orbison–Videos

The Platters–Videos

Elvis Presley–Videos

Queen–Videos

Otis Redding–Videos

Lionel Richie–Videos

The Righteous Brothers–Videos

The Rolling Stones–Videos

Linda Ronstadt–Videos

Neil Sedaka–Videos

Diana Ross and The Supremes–Videos

Carly Simon–Videos

Simon & Garfunkel–Videos

Frank Sinatra–Videos

Dusty Springfield–Videos

Bruce Springsteen–Videos

Rod Stewart–Videos

Barbra Streisand–Videos

Songs

Singers and Songs: Musical Artists–Videos

Donna Summer–Videos

Switchfoot–Videos

James Taylor–Videos

Tina Turner–Videos

Shania Twain–Videos

Village People–Videos

Hayley Westenra–Videos

Steve Winwood–Videos

Stevie Wonder–Videos

Tammy Wynette–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Jim Croce — Videos

Posted on November 12, 2013. Filed under: Art, Communications, Life, Music, Songs, Videos | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

croce9_jim_maury

Jim-Croce-wid

Jim Croce Behind The Music

Jim Croce Video Tape Network (VTN) Concert 1973

Jim Croce “One Of A Kind” 1973 KCET-TV (Part 1 of 2)

Groovy Movies: Jim Croce “One Of A Kind” 1973 KCET-TV (Part 2 of 2)

Jim Croce – I Got a Name (1973)

Jim Croce – I’ll Have To Say I Love You In A Song (1973)

Jim Croce – Time in a bottle – 1973

Jim Croce – Operator (That’s Not The Way It Feels)

Jim Croce – Bad Bad Leroy Brown (Midnight Special – 1973)

Jim Croce – Lovers Cross – BBC

Jim Croce -These Dreams

Jim Croce – Bad Bad Leroy Brown (Live) [remastered 16:9]

Jim Croce – New York’s Not My Home

Jim Croce – The Hard Way Everytime

Jim Croce – Recently

Jim Croce 1973 Final Show Louisiana

Photographs & Memories: His Greatest Hits by Jim Croce ( Full Album )

jim_croce_50th

Background Articles and Videos

An Afternoon With Ingrid Croce

Nyberg: A.J. Croce speaks about dad’s music

Jim Croce

James Joseph “Jim” Croce (/ˈkri/; January 10, 1943 – September 20, 1973) was an American singer-songwriter. Between 1966 and 1973, Croce released five studio albums and 11 singles. His singles “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” and “Time in a Bottle” were both number one hits on the Billboard Hot 100 charts.

Early life

Croce was born in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on January 10, 1943, to James Albert and Flora Mary (Babucci) Croce, Italian Americans.[2] Croce took a strong interest in music at a young age. At five, he learned to play his first song on the accordion, “Lady of Spain.”

Croce attended Upper Darby High School in Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania. After graduating in 1960, he studied at Malvern Preparatory School for a year before enrolling at Villanova University, where he majored in psychology and minored inGerman.[3][4] He graduated with a Bachelor degree in 1965. Croce was zxcvsafdgtfawerga member of the Villanova Singers and the Villanova Spires. When the Spires performed off-campus or made recordings, they were known as The Coventry Lads.[5] Croce was also a student disc jockey at WKVU (which has since become WXVU).[6][7][8]

Career

Early career

Croce did not take music seriously until he studied at Villanova, where he formed bands and performed at fraternity parties, coffee houses, and universities around Philadelphia, playing “anything that the people wanted to hear: blues, rock, a cappella, railroad music… anything.” Croce’s band was chosen for a foreign exchange tour of AfricaMiddle East, and Yugoslavia. He later said, “we just ate what the people ate, lived in the woods, and played our songs. Of course they didn’t speak English over there but if you mean what you’re singing, people understand.” Croce met his future wife Ingrid Jacobson at a hootenanny at Philadelphia Convention Hall, where he was judging a contest.

Croce released his first album, Facets, in 1966, with 500 copies pressed. The album had been financed with a $500 wedding gift from Croce’s parents, who set a condition that the money must be spent to make an album. They hoped that he would give up music after the album failed, and use his college education to pursue a “respectable” profession.[9] However, the album proved a success, with every copy sold.

1960s

From the mid-1960s to early 1970s, Croce performed with his wife as a duo. At first, their performances included songs by artists such as Ian and SylviaGordon LightfootJoan Baez, and Woody Guthrie, but in time they began writing their own music. During this time, Croce got his first long-term gig at a rural bar and steak house in Lima, Pennsylvania, called The Riddle Paddock. His set list covered several genres, including blues, country, rock and roll, and folk.

Croce married his wife Ingrid in 1966, and converted to Judaism, as his wife was Jewish, though he became non-practicing and was generally anti-organized religion. He and Ingrid were married in a traditional Jewish ceremony.[10] He enlisted in the Army National Guard that same year to avoid being drafted and deployed to Vietnam, and served on active duty for four months, leaving for duty a week after his honeymoon.[11] Croce, who was not good with authority, had to go through basic training twice.[12] He said he would be prepared if “there’s ever a war where we have to defend ourselves with mops”.

In 1968, the Croces were encouraged by record producer Tommy West to move to New York City. The couple spent time in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx and recorded their first album with Capitol Records. During the next two years, they drove more than 300,000 miles,[13] playing small clubs and concerts on the college concert circuit promoting their album Jim & Ingrid Croce.

Becoming disillusioned by the music business and New York City, they sold all but one guitar to pay the rent and returned to the Pennsylvania countryside, settling in an old farm in Lyndell, where Croce got a job driving trucks and doing construction work to pay the bills while continuing to write songs, often about the characters he would meet at the local bars and truck stops and his experiences at work; these provided the material for such songs as “Big Wheels” and “Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues“.

1970s

The couple returned to Philadelphia and Croce decided to be “serious” about becoming a productive member of society. “I’d worked construction crews, and I’d been a welder while I was in college. But I’d rather do other things than get burned,” he later said. His determination to be “serious” led to a job at a Philadelphia R&B AM radio station, WHAT, where he translated commercials into “soul”. “I’d sell airtime to Bronco’s Poolroom and then write the spot: “You wanna be cool, and you wanna shoot pool… dig it.”

In 1970, Croce met the classically trained pianist-guitarist and singer-songwriter Maury Muehleisen from Trenton, New Jersey through producer Joe Salviuolo. Salviuolo had been friends with Croce when they attended Villanova University together, and Salviuolo later discovered Muehleisen when he was teaching at Glassboro State College in New Jersey. Salviuolo brought the Croce and Muehleisen duo together at the production office of Tommy West and Terry Cashman in New York City. Initially, Croce backed Muehleisen on guitar at his gigs but in time their roles reversed, with Muehleisen adding lead guitar to Croce’s music.

In 1972, Croce signed to a three-record deal with ABC Records and released two albums, You Don’t Mess Around with Jim and Life and Times. The singles “You Don’t Mess Around with Jim“, “Operator (That’s Not the Way It Feels)“, and “Time in a Bottle” (written for his then-unborn son, A. J. Croce) all received airplay. Croce’s biggest single, “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown“, hit No. 1 on the American charts in July 1973. That year, the Croces relocated to San DiegoCalifornia.

As his career picked up, Croce began touring the United States with Muehleisen, performing live, including in large coffee houses, on college campuses, and at folk festivals. However, Croce’s financial situation was still dire. The record company had fronted him the money to record the album, and much of the money the album earned went back to pay the advance. In February 1973, Croce and Muehleisen traveled to Europe to promote the album, visiting LondonParis, and Amsterdam, and getting positive reviews. Croce also began appearing on television, including onDon Kirshner’s Rock Concert and The Midnight Special, which he co-hosted. In July 1973, Croce and Muehleisen again visited London and performed on The Old Grey Whistle Test. Croce finished recording the album I Got a Name one week before his death. During his tours, Croce grew increasingly homesick, and decided to take a break from music and settle down with his wife and infant son after his Life and Times tour was completed.[14][15] In a letter to his wife which arrived after his death, Croce stated his intention to quit music and stick to writing short stories and movie scripts as a career, and withdraw from public life.[16][17]

Death

On Thursday, September 20, 1973, during Croce’s Life and Times tour and the day before his ABC single “I Got a Name” was released, Croce, Muehleisen, and four others were killed when the chartered Beechcraft E18S he was traveling in crashed while taking off from the Natchitoches Regional Airport in Natchitoches, Louisiana. Others who died in the crash were charter pilot Robert N. Elliott, comedian George Stevens, manager and booking agent Kenneth D. Cortose, and road manager Dennis Rast.[18][19] Croce had just completed a concert at Northwestern State University‘s Prather Coliseum in Natchitoches and was flying to Sherman, Texas, for a concert at Austin College. The plane crashed an hour after the end of the concert.

An investigation showed that the plane crashed on take off after clipping a pecan tree at the end of the runway. The plane failed to gain enough altitude to clear the tree and did not maneuver to avoid it, even though it was the only tree for hundreds of yards. It was reported as dark, but with clear sky, calm winds, and over five miles of visibility with haze. The report from the NTSB[20] listed the probable cause as the pilot’s failure to see and avoid obstructions due to pilot physical impairment and fog obstructing vision. The 57-year-old charter pilot suffered from severe coronary artery disease and had run three miles to the airport from a motel. He had an ATP Certificate, 14,290 hours total flight time and 2,190 hours in the Beech 18 type.[20] A later investigation placed sole blame for the accident on pilot error due to his downwind takeoff into a “black hole”.[21]

Jim Croce was buried at Haym Salomon Memorial Park in Frazer, Pennsylvania.[22]

Legacy

The album I Got a Name was released on December 1, 1973.[23] The posthumous release included three hits: “Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues“, “I’ll Have to Say I Love You in a Song“, and the title song, which had been used as the theme to the film The Last American Hero which was released two months prior to his death. The album reached No. 2 and “I’ll Have to Say I Love You in a Song” reached No. 9 on the singles chart.

The song “Time in a Bottle” had been featured over the opening and closing credits and during a scene in which Desi Arnaz Jr. is opening the You Don’t Mess Around With Jim album in the ABC made-for-television movie She Lives!, which aired on September 12, 1973.[24] That appearance had generated significant interest in Croce and his music in the week just prior to the plane crash. That, combined with the news of the death of the singer, sparked a renewed interest in Croce’s previous albums. Consequently, three months later, “Time in a Bottle”, originally released on Croce’s first album the year before, hit number one on December 29, 1973, the third posthumous chart-topping song of the rock era following Otis Redding‘s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” and Janis Joplin‘s recording of “Me and Bobby McGee“.

greatest hits package entitled Photographs & Memories was released in 1974. Later posthumous releases have included Home Recordings: AmericanaFacetsJim Croce: Classic HitsDown the Highway, and DVD and CD releases of Croce’s television performances, Have You Heard: Jim Croce Live. In 1990, Croce was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.[25]

The Croces’ son Adrian James (born September 28, 1971) is a singer-songwriter, musician, and pianist, and he owns and operates his own record label, Seedling Records.[26]

From 1985 to 2013 Ingrid Croce owned and managed Croce’s Restaurant & Jazz Bar—a project she and Croce had jokingly discussed a decade earlier—in the historic Gaslamp Quarter in downtown San Diego.[27] On July 3, 2012, she published a memoir about her husband, entitled I Got a Name: The Jim Croce Story.[28]

Discography

Main article: Jim Croce discography

Croce had recorded a total of five studio albums and eleven singles by the time of his death.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Croce

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Abba–Videos

Adele–Videos

The Animals–Videos

Joan Baez–Videos

The Beach Boys–Videos

The Beatles–Videos

Bee Gees–Videos

The Byrds–Videos

Mariah Carey–Videos

Johnny Cash–Videos

Eva Cassidy–Videos

Ray Charles–Videos

Joe Cocker–Videos

Nat King Cole–Videos

Judy Collins–Videos

Perry Como–Videos

Sam Cooke–Videos

Doris Day–Videos

Sandy Denny–Videos

John Denver–Videos

Celine Dion–Videos

The Doors–Videos

Bob Dylan–Videos

Eagles–Video

Marianne Faithfull–Videos

Roberta Flack–Videos

Aretha Franklin–Videos

Marvin Gaye-Videos

Whitney Houston–Videos

Janis Ian–Videos

Michael Jackson and Jackson Five–Videos

Elton John–Videos

Janis Joplan–Videos

The Kinks–Videos

Led Zeppelin–Videos

Little Richard–Videos

The Lovin’ Spoonful–Videos

The Mamas and Papas–Videos

Barry Manilow–Videos

Johnny Mathis–Videos

Don McLean–Videos

Bette Midler–Videos

Joni Mitchell–Videos

Olivia Newton-John–Videos

Roy Orbison–Videos

The Platters–Videos

Elvis Presley–Videos

Queen–Videos

Otis Redding–Videos

Lionel Richie–Videos

The Righteous Brothers–Videos

The Rolling Stones–Videos

Linda Ronstadt–Videos

Sam & Dave–Videos

Neil Sedaka–Videos

Bob Seger–Videos

Diana Ross and The Supremes–Videos

Carly Simon–Videos

Simon & Garfunkel–Videos

Frank Sinatra–Videos

Dusty Springfield–Videos

Bruce Springsteen–Videos

Rod Stewart–Videos

Barbra Streisand–Videos

Songs

Singers and Songs: Musical Artists–Videos

Donna Summer–Videos

Switchfoot–Videos

James Taylor–Videos

Tina Turner–Videos

Shania Twain–Videos

Village People–Videos

Hayley Westenra–Videos

Steve Winwood–Videos

Stevie Wonder–Videos

Tammy Wynette–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...